Marietta City Council Fourth Ward

Geoff Schenkel

¯ Age: 45.

¯ Address: 214 Putnam Ave.

¯ Political Party: Democrat.

¯ Occupation: Artist and owner of REsolve Studios

¯ Previous public offices held: None.

1. There are many blighted properties in the fourth ward as well as throughout the city. What can council do to rid neighborhoods of this?

There are times when blight needs to be aggressively demolished.

When places approach that threshold, becoming so neglected that they become fertile ground for crime, we need to be decisive. Not acting in such situations has a negative effect on neighborhoods and communities. I’ve made the tough call to step in and demolish neglected structures before neglect had a chance to take a greater toll.

But when the opportunity exists, I far prefer the redevelopment of properties. Redevelopment is an option I have devoted time and energy toward over the years. By immersing myself in that process, I learned the nuts and bolts, the practical aspects of redevelopment as well as the transformative power redevelopment radiates as a positive force out into its community.

Because I recognize when one option is appropriate and when the other is the better choice, my experience will guide me to judgements most suited to each unique situation.

Knowing that one size does not fit all and what tool best fits the task at hand is, in my mind, the key to this issue.

2. Residents in the fourth ward, particularly Harmar Hill, speak about a need for more businesses, particularly grocery stores, convenience stores etc. What could you do as a councilman to help facilitate business growth there?

My ability to build relationships and navigate systems are the skills I will rely on to facilitate business growth in Marietta and the 4th Ward.

As a businessman in the 4th Ward I know that this is a good place to grow so it’s a message I can speak quite naturally when working with the administration and our Community Development Office to engage both the residents of our neighborhoods and the interests of business so that we can facilitate wise and well planned growth.

I’m 45 years old and in each job I’ve completed in the 20 plus years of my working life I’ve had to be a quick study. To succeed it was critically important to learn the priorities motivating my private clients, the guidelines within which education officials must work, and the unique characteristics of each community. Armed with these insights, I found ways to honor that uniqueness while at the same time being a good steward of the government and/or private funding entrusted to me. I’ve been doing this my entire working life and by building relationships and understanding the limits and potentials within systems, I will be able to help the Administration, City Development and my neighbors put development tools to work for us.

Glen McCabe

¯ Age: 58.

¯ Address: 106 Lincoln Circle.

¯ Political party: Republican.

¯ Occupation: Owner of McCabe Construction.

¯ Previous public offices held: None.

1. There are many blighted properties in the fourth ward as well as throughout the city. What can council do to rid neighborhoods of this?

Blighted properties have to go. They are a safety hazard . But they also cost the city money in property taxes . Also it drives down property values which is not fair to owners who keep their property up. Another problem is what to do with the empty lots they create and the cost to the city to keep them mowed and maintained. It would be unacceptable for tax payers to have to keep footing the bill. We need to get creative and find ways to encourage redevelopment. Maybe sell them off. This would bring back money in the way of property taxes. Other cities have been successful in doing so.

2. Residents in the fourth ward, particularly Harmar Hill, speak about a need for more businesses, particularly grocery stores, convenience stores etc. What could you do as a councilman to help facilitate business growth there?

This is the second time I ran for the fourth ward. I have knocked on just about every door each time and talked to many people along the way. Honestly I have not heard that question one time. Harmar Hill is pretty much all residential and tightly packed with houses. There is only one corner at Lancaster/676 that has room for businesses. There is already a BP gas station/convenience store and a building next to it that has been vacant for five years. If a grocery company or a private entrepreneur wanted to or thought about opening one they would have to see the need and would it be profitable. Harmar Hill has no space and is out of the way for most people. People shop where there are more stores so they can take care of all their shopping needs. Frontier shopping center, Giant Eagle, Dollar General are all five minutes away.

Lafayette Plaza is only seven minutes away. Kroger is seven minutes away. Walmart and Lowes are 10 minutes away. If people have trouble getting there or do not drive there is always the bus.