College, high school students collaborate

Ideas on entrepreneurship shared at peer workshop

PEYTON NEELY   The Marietta Times
Marietta High School senior Jackson Kelly, 18, works with Marietta College students Jane Peterson, 18, of Minot, N.D., and Hilary Hao, 21, of Bejing, China, at Marietta College during a peer mentorship class for the entrepreneurship classes at both the high school and the college.

PEYTON NEELY The Marietta Times Marietta High School senior Jackson Kelly, 18, works with Marietta College students Jane Peterson, 18, of Minot, N.D., and Hilary Hao, 21, of Bejing, China, at Marietta College during a peer mentorship class for the entrepreneurship classes at both the high school and the college.

Working minds of high school and college students congregated into Room 103 of Thomas Hall on Marietta College’s campus Monday to explore new ideas and share existing ideas among each other.

The entrepreneurship classes at Marietta High School and Marietta College joined forces to learn about the other class and to brainstorm. It was the first time the two entrepreneurship classes merged and both teachers of the classes agreed this wouldn’t be the last time.

“I teach my students to identify problems and work in groups to establish a solution,” said Julie Harding, assistant professor for marketing at Marietta College. “It’s beneficial anytime we have like-minded students that share the same mindset and work together making their ideas continue to grow.”

Kim Depue, career exploration teacher, teaches the entrepreneurship class for Marietta High School and said her students are doing similar things at the high school level.

“Marietta High School has already been partnering with Marietta College for the DRIVE entrepreneurship camp over the summer and the Pio Expo in the fall,” she said. “Entrepreneurship isn’t just coming up with an idea, it’s having that mindset to share your ideas.”

This is the first semester that Marietta High School has offered the entrepreneurship class in a classroom setting. Last year, the class was offered online through Stark State College.

“Now students are taking the class in a classroom setting for the same Stark State credit,” said Depue. “This is a course that needs to be offered with a hands-on instructor with all the resources that students have in Washington County now, like the Epicenter.”

Students in both classes formed groups of three or four to complete a worksheet. This got the gears in their heads spinning with plans of development they would all share with each other. College students mentored the high school students with the knowledge they already have.

“I never realized how much goes into running a business until I took this class,” said Marietta High School senior Jackson Kelly, 18. “There’s surveying that needs done and intense marketing just to see if a business is viable.”

Kelly was working among three Marietta College students. Taylor Pennock, 18, of Beverly, is majoring in management and economics.

“Just seeing things from the high schoolers’ perspective is so much different and I was just in high school,” she said. “It’s enjoyable to see what problems they have and how they’re solving them.”

Jane Peterson, 18, of Minot, N.D., is a freshman at Marietta College who back home, owns and operates a bee-keeping business.

“With my business, I didn’t think there was a lot to it,” she said. “Now I see the problems and have a more in-depth mindset about what it takes to be an entrepreneur.”

Marietta High School sophomore Greyson Turner, 15, said he didn’t have an interest in this type of business at all at the beginning of the year but now has a different perspective he never would have had without this class.

“It’s helping me decide what I want to do with my life,” he said.

Spencer Tenney, 16, is a sophomore at Marietta High School and said that since taking this class, he’s not as afraid to talk to people.

“Before I would just kind of sit there and listen to everyone’s ideas and now I’m throwing everything that comes into my head out there,” he said. “I really opened up.”

Hilary Hao, 21, is a senior at Marietta College from Bejing, China. She said she has learned a lot about the open mind-et that entrepreneurs have.

“The communicating and thinking by people is different in the United States and China,” she said. “The concepts are about the same but the thinking is different.”

This is the first academic year that entrepreneurship as a minor has been offered at Marietta College.

Each of the classes are going to continue to work together.

For their final projects, there’s going to be a Junior Pio Pitch next month where all the students will share their ideas.

“These classes share wonderful concepts for the younger generation,” said Depue. “Millennials aren’t afraid to go a little bit out of their comfort zone and that’s why I would love to see this partnership grow.”

At a glance

¯ Students from Marietta High School and Marietta College worked together on Monday.

¯ The students were from the entrepreneurship classes at their respective schools.

¯ Students worked together on idea sharing and discussions pertaining to future plans.

¯ This is the first time this partnership has come together.

¯ Teachers of both classes hope to continue the merging of classes.

Source: Entrepreneurship teachers Kim Depue from Marietta High School and Julie Harding from Marietta College.

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