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Pollinators Abuzz

Photos by Janelle Patterson A carpenter bee collects pollen from mountain mint in the REsolve Studios Westside Gardens Monday. “The carpenter bee people frequently mistake for a bumblebee, but the carpenter is shiny and black while the bumblebee is fuzzy,” Dr. Rebecca Phillips said as she prepared handouts Monday on pollinator gardening to share during Harmar Days this weekend. “Neither are aggressive, neither are likely to sting you. The bumblebee nests in holes in the ground, the carpenter nests in wood, preferring things like dead trees. Another bee that is really important for pollination for our fruit trees is called either the mason bee or the fruit bee. They’re really important for apples and peaches.” Learn more about native pollinators through trivia and scavenger hunts at the Green Sanctuary’s pollinator hour during Familygrams put on by The Marietta Times, REsolve Studios and the Rivers, Trails and Ales Festival during Harmar Days on Saturday and Sunday.
An Eastern Tiger Swallowtail lands on a butterfly bush in the REsolve Studios Westside Gardens Monday. “Unfortunately, Ohio has lost some 30 percent of its butterfly and moth population in the last 20 years,” said Phillips. “One of the reasons for that is if you want butterflies, you have to allow caterpillars to eat your plants and we often spray our plants so they don’t get eaten but that wipes out the next generation of butterflies.” These visitors are likely to be seen during naturalist tours hosted during Harmar Days between the partnership of the Green Sanctuary partnering project between Phillips’ peers at the First Unitarian Universalist Society of Marietta, Passiflora, and the Historic Harmar Bridge Company at HHBC Maple Street property, and leading to the riverbank pollinator garden above the Harmar Docks below the Gilman United Methodist Church along the Muskingum River.
A honey bee stops to collect nectar from a butterfly bush in the REsolve Studios Westside Gardens Monday. “The honey bee is not native to North America, it was brought here by eastern European settlers,” said Phillips. “But there are 4,000 species of bees native to North America. There are about 400 species of bees native to Ohio, a lot we don’t even think about because they’re tiny or live out in the woods.”
A monarch butterfly prepares to take flight from a butterfly bush in the REsolve Studios Westside Gardens Monday.
An Eastern Tiger Swallowtail lands on a butterfly bush in the REsolve Studios Westside Gardens Monday. “Unfortunately, Ohio has lost some 30 percent of its butterfly and moth population in the last 20 years,” said Phillips. “One of the reasons for that is if you want butterflies, you have to allow caterpillars to eat your plants and we often spray our plants so they don’t get eaten but that wipes out the next generation of butterflies.” These visitors are likely to be seen during naturalist tours hosted during Harmar Days between the partnership of the Green Sanctuary partnering project between Phillips’ peers at the First Unitarian Universalist Society of Marietta, Passiflora, and the Historic Harmar Bridge Company at HHBC Maple Street property, and leading to the riverbank pollinator garden above the Harmar Docks below the Gilman United Methodist Church along the Muskingum River.

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