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Alzheimer’s Walk held

The Walk to End Alzheimer’s was full of flowers, each one representing a connection to Alzheimer’s - and a reason to end the disease.

Tomlinson Park in Williamstown was full of color as community members gathered to raise awareness of Alzheimer’s.

The Walk to End Alzheimer’s was full of flowers, each one representing a connection to Alzheimer’s – and a reason to end the disease.

Those who had a blue flower, are living with Alzheimer’s or another dementia.

Those who had a yellow flower, are supporting or caring for someone living with Alzheimer’s.

Those who had a purple flower, participated in Walk because they have lost someone to Alzheimer’s or another dementia.

Photos by Madeline Scarborough Traci Eddy was joined at the walk by her mother and two sons in memory of her father Keith Ware. They walked while carrying a banner in his memory Saturday.

And those who had a orange flower, are supporting the cause.

“Take a look at the symbolic flowers that surround you,” said Brittany Huffman, a member of the Alzheimer’s Association. “Like flowers, we don’t stop when something’s in our way. We keep pushing for a breakthrough in the fight against Alzheimer’s and all other dementia”

Huffman said that the colorful display gives her and many others hope.

“I am confident that – one day – we will add a flower to this garden; A white flower that represents the first survivor of Alzheimer’s… Wouldn’t that be an incredible addition to our garden?,” she said.

“Until that beautiful day happens, we must not back down. We must continue to lead the way. Because – together, we can end Alzheimer’s!”

Tomlinson Park in Williamstown was full of color as community members gathered to raise awareness of Alzheimer’s.

According to the association’s statistics, one in three seniors dies with Alzheimer’s or another dementia.

“My dad Keith Ware died from COVID-19, but he fought Alzheimer’s for 16 years before that,” said Traci Eddy.

Eddy was joined at the walk by her mother and two sons who also experienced being caretakers over the years with her father.

“It was hard, but I am glad I didn’t miss out on any time we had with him,” said Eddy.

According to Eddy her father was an Airforce veteran who served in Vietnam.

“He would often go back there, and it was best not to correct him, but to meet him where he was that day,” said Eddy.

Eddy said that throughout all that time though, her father never lost his smile or sense of humor.

“It was hard, I feel like we lost my dad three times,” said Eddy. “Once to dementia, another time when we could no longer care for him ourselves (the very last year before his passing) and when he passed… Caretaking was an emotional toll on everyone, but I wouldn’t trade it and I wouldn’t want to lose one second.”

If registering for the 2021 Jackson County Walk, do so through the MOV website, put ‘Jackson’ in the name of your team. The Jackson County Walk will take place downtown Ripley at the courthouse square Oct. 30th at 5 p.m. as part of the Freaky 5K/Ripley Race Series.

“Alzheimer’s is not stopping – neither are we,” said Huffman.

Madeline Scarborough can be reached at mscarborough@newsandsentinel.com

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